Wednesday, 13 April 2016

BIG DATA IN KENYA

  • Big Data—which may be understood as a more powerful form of data mining that relies on huge volumes of data, faster computers, and new analytic techniques to discover hidden and surprising correlations—challenges our national privacy laws(if they are there) in several ways:To any Kenyan out there who is aware or/and self conscious  of what make his/her digital e-world revolve,it casts doubt on the distinction between personal and non-personal data, clashes with data minimization, and undermines informed choice.
  • Personally i think our dear beloved country has never considered a General Data Protection Regulation that would replace the ageing Data Protection Directive despite having CAK(communication Authority of Kenya) set in place for a number of years now. This Regulation will create both new individual rights and imposes new accountability measures on organizations that collect or process data.But the Big Data tsunami is likely to overwhelm these reform efforts(**Chuckle**....since we all know why). Thus, a supplementary approach should be considered using codes of conduct. In particular, CAK should encourage businesses to adopt new business models premised on consumer empowerment by offering incentives such as regulatory flexibility and reduced penalties.
My Fellow STEM lovers,lets push for this agenda to be regulated if not yet!#ProudKenyan

Tuesday, 12 April 2016

SOURCE CODE FOR MY WORDPRESS BLOG....ON KALI LINUX TERMINAL

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  <title>OUR FUTURE CLOUD.</title>
  <link>https://sknjeri.wordpress.com/2014/11/04/our-future-cloud-2/</link>
  <comments>https://sknjeri.wordpress.com/2014/11/04/our-future-cloud-2/#respond</comments>
  <pubDate>Tue, 04 Nov 2014 12:07:43 +0000</pubDate>
  <dc:creator><![CDATA[samwelkariuki]]></dc:creator>
    <category><![CDATA[Uncategorized]]></category>

  <guid isPermaLink="false">http://sknjeri.wordpress.com/?p=188</guid>
  <description><![CDATA[OUR FUTURE CLOUD.. Physical Servers Vs Virtual Servers Vs Cloud There can be several different reasons why Kenyan businesses ad companies are choosing either a Physical or Virtual Server for their day to day errands. Considerations such as business size, needs and price are all factors to take in to account. My goal is to give [&#8230;]<img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=sknjeri.wordpress.com&#038;blog=51744474&#038;post=188&#038;subd=sknjeri&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />]]></description>
    <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><a href="https://sknjeri.wordpress.com/2014/11/04/our-future-cloud/">OUR FUTURE CLOUD.</a>.</p>
<h1 class="page-title entry-title" style="font-family:'Times New Roman';margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;padding:27px 40px 5px;vertical-align:baseline;outline:none;border:none;font-weight:normal;line-height:36px;letter-spacing:-.01em;color:#666666;background-image:initial;background-attachment:initial;background-size:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;background-position:initial;background-repeat:initial;"><span style="line-height:22px;background-color:transparent;"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">Physical Servers Vs Virtual Servers Vs Cloud</span></span></h1>
<div class="entry-content" style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:medium;margin:0;padding:0 40px 18px;vertical-align:baseline;outline:none;border:none;box-sizing:border-box;clear:both;float:left;width:920px;color:#666666;line-height:22px;background-image:initial;background-attachment:initial;background-size:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;background-position:initial;background-repeat:initial;">
<p style="margin-bottom:0;padding:5px 0;vertical-align:baseline;outline:none;border:none;background-image:initial;background-attachment:initial;background-color:transparent;background-size:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;background-position:initial;background-repeat:initial;"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">There can be several different reasons why Kenyan businesses ad companies are choosing either a Physical or Virtual Server for their day to day errands. Considerations such as business size, needs and price are all factors to take in to account. My goal is to give you a helicopter view of the key points of each so when you discuss the options best suited for your firm,you are informed on some of the terminology and factors.</span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0;padding:5px 0;vertical-align:baseline;outline:none;border:none;background-image:initial;background-attachment:initial;background-color:transparent;background-size:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;background-position:initial;background-repeat:initial;"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">Physical Servers:</span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0;padding:5px 0;vertical-align:baseline;outline:none;border:none;background-image:initial;background-attachment:initial;background-color:transparent;background-size:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;background-position:initial;background-repeat:initial;"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">Physical Servers are the traditional way of doing things (in IT traditional means more than 3 years ago!) and involve a piece(s) of hardware that are configured to perform the tasks of your business. Generally this hardware is in your server room or broom closet. They can play any role required in the business, from Mail Server to a Web Host Server or even a combination of a wide variety of roles where required. With physical servers there is a tendency to try and do more with less.</span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0;padding:5px 0;vertical-align:baseline;outline:none;border:none;background-image:initial;background-attachment:initial;background-color:transparent;background-size:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;background-position:initial;background-repeat:initial;"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">The advantage of a Physical Server for a small business with limited server needs, is that the one server can perform all the tasks required for the day to day running of the business. As your business scales up in size you will have a 2nd server and 3rd and so on, the number generally corresponding with scale of the business. Each server will generally be critical to the business in some form because rarely do people sign off on implementing a new server to do something inconsequential. Inconsequential tasks are added to an existing server where it won’t conflict with something in place.</span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0;padding:5px 0;vertical-align:baseline;outline:none;border:none;background-image:initial;background-attachment:initial;background-color:transparent;background-size:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;background-position:initial;background-repeat:initial;"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">Virtual Servers:</span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0;padding:5px 0;vertical-align:baseline;outline:none;border:none;background-image:initial;background-attachment:initial;background-color:transparent;background-size:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;background-position:initial;background-repeat:initial;"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">A Virtual Server is normally one of many servers that operate upon a single physical server with each virtual server sharing the resources of the physical server between them. However an effective virtual infrastructure cannot run upon a single physical server so proper implementation of virtual servers requires the use of multiple physical servers and more than likely a device capable of providing shared storage between the physical servers. This means the starting cost of a Virtual Server solution is higher than that of a single physical server solution.</span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0;padding:5px 0;vertical-align:baseline;outline:none;border:none;background-image:initial;background-attachment:initial;background-color:transparent;background-size:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;background-position:initial;background-repeat:initial;"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">The advantage of Virtual Servers is that each server can be run upon any capable physical server and so the failure of a physical server, with a proper environment in place, means any affected servers that were sharing that physical server, can be started up seamlessly on any other available physical server. This can even be automated within most virtual infrastructure solutions which leads to near zero downtime. One of the consequences however of Virtual Servers is that because you can have multiple Virtual Servers on a physical server the temptation is to put each software product onto its own server because there is not the cost limitation of having to have one physical server for each. This is known in the industry as “server sprawl” and it is something to be avoided. While the benefits of Virtual Servers are significant, they still need to be planned and maintained effectively to ensure their continued productivity.</span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0;padding:5px 0;vertical-align:baseline;outline:none;border:none;background-image:initial;background-attachment:initial;background-color:transparent;background-size:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;background-position:initial;background-repeat:initial;"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">Cloud:</span></p>
<p class="separator" style="margin-bottom:0;text-align:center;clear:both;"><img id="BLOG_video-UPLOADING-0" class="tr_noresize tr_placeholder BLOGGER-new-video BLOGGER-object-element" style="cursor:move;margin-left:1em;margin-right:1em;" src="https://www.blogger.com/video-thumbnail.g?contentId=UPLOADING" alt="" /></p>
<p class="separator" style="margin-bottom:0;text-align:center;clear:both;">
<p style="margin-bottom:0;padding:5px 0;vertical-align:baseline;outline:none;border:none;background-image:initial;background-attachment:initial;background-color:transparent;background-size:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;background-position:initial;background-repeat:initial;"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">Cloud is a general term, largely expressed in marketing, to describe any server/service that is put outside your own control for someone else to maintain on your behalf. This type of solution is not new and have historically been called outsourcing, services from Application Service Providers and more going back over the last 4 years in Kenya. The Cloud terminology has gained great traction with decision makers because it sounds like a wonderful and cheap solution to remove IT considerations from a business.</span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0;padding:5px 0;vertical-align:baseline;outline:none;border:none;background-image:initial;background-attachment:initial;background-color:transparent;background-size:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;background-position:initial;background-repeat:initial;"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">My note of caution with Cloud solutions is that anyone who has used IT services will know that the quality of service varies greatly between providers and even over time, with some providers being exceptional but gradually failing to deliver sometimes after years of effective service. Cloud solutions are generally designed by the provider as a one way solution. They assume that everyone that uses them will be forever happy with them and will never want to leave and so designing or considering the process of a customer leaving is rarely addressed. Strategic use of Public Cloud, Private Cloud, Hybrid Cloud and any other Cloud term you are likely to see or hear is definitely effective and a number of Kenyan Engineers have been providing services that are considered Cloud for a number of years now. In fact they are probablyamong the most experienced Cloud providers there is in Africa. However implementing a Cloud solution is something that everyone has to go into with their eyes wide open and a clear understanding of what will be provided, who will provide, who has access to your information, is it protected from disaster (and is the provider responsible for its loss!) and ultimately can you move to more advanced services or services that suit your business better in the future that will inevitably occur.</span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0;padding:5px 0;vertical-align:baseline;outline:none;border:none;background-image:initial;background-attachment:initial;background-color:transparent;background-size:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;background-position:initial;background-repeat:initial;"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">There are several advantages and disadvantages to each option. These range from power consumption, storage requirements, maintenance, product licensing and more. This wide range of considerations also mean almost no business has the exact same needs as another and so it is important to ensure you engage someone competent in all of these options and considerations before you make any decision so that the decision you make is the right one. The cost and effort involved in reversing decisions that turn out to be wrong can be catastrophic.</span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0;padding:5px 0;vertical-align:baseline;outline:none;border:none;background-image:initial;background-attachment:initial;background-color:transparent;background-size:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;background-position:initial;background-repeat:initial;"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">There are several Kenyan engineers who are now widely versed in these solutions and implement and support every conceivable variation of them on a daily basis. If anyone would like to mail and find more on these expertise and knowledge please email sknjeri@wichita.edu or samwelkariuki@icloud.com and i will gladly assist you.May Africa stars shine beyond the so called or discussed Cloud services.Its time for africa to rise and shine.</span></p>
</div><br />  <a rel="nofollow" href="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/gocomments/sknjeri.wordpress.com/188/"><img alt="" border="0" src="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/comments/sknjeri.wordpress.com/188/" /></a> <img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=sknjeri.wordpress.com&#038;blog=51744474&#038;post=188&#038;subd=sknjeri&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />]]></content:encoded>
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  <item>
  <title>OUR FUTURE CLOUD.</title>
  <link>https://sknjeri.wordpress.com/2014/11/04/our-future-cloud/</link>
  <comments>https://sknjeri.wordpress.com/2014/11/04/our-future-cloud/#respond</comments>
  <pubDate>Tue, 04 Nov 2014 11:52:56 +0000</pubDate>
  <dc:creator><![CDATA[samwelkariuki]]></dc:creator>
    <category><![CDATA[Uncategorized]]></category>

  <guid isPermaLink="false">http://sknjeri.wordpress.com/?p=185</guid>
  <description><![CDATA[Physical Servers Vs Virtual Servers Vs Cloud There can be several different reasons why Kenyan businesses ad companies are choosing either a Physical or Virtual Server for their day to day errands. Considerations such as business size, needs and price are all factors to take in to account. My goal is to give you a [&#8230;]<img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=sknjeri.wordpress.com&#038;blog=51744474&#038;post=185&#038;subd=sknjeri&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />]]></description>
    <content:encoded><![CDATA[<h1 class="page-title entry-title"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">Physical Servers Vs Virtual Servers Vs Cloud</span></h1>
<div class="entry-content">
<p><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">There can be several different reasons why Kenyan businesses ad companies are choosing either a Physical or Virtual Server for their day to day errands. Considerations such as business size, needs and price are all factors to take in to account. My goal is to give you a helicopter view of the key points of each so when you discuss the options best suited for your firm,you are informed on some of the terminology and factors.</span></p>
<p><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">Physical Servers:</span></p>
<p><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">Physical Servers are the traditional way of doing things (in IT traditional means more than 3 years ago!) and involve a piece(s) of hardware that are configured to perform the tasks of your business. Generally this hardware is in your server room or broom closet. They can play any role required in the business, from Mail Server to a Web Host Server or even a combination of a wide variety of roles where required. With physical servers there is a tendency to try and do more with less.</span></p>
<p><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">The advantage of a Physical Server for a small business with limited server needs, is that the one server can perform all the tasks required for the day to day running of the business. As your business scales up in size you will have a 2nd server and 3rd and so on, the number generally corresponding with scale of the business. Each server will generally be critical to the business in some form because rarely do people sign off on implementing a new server to do something inconsequential. Inconsequential tasks are added to an existing server where it won’t conflict with something in place.</span></p>
<p><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">Virtual Servers:</span></p>
<p><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">A Virtual Server is normally one of many servers that operate upon a single physical server with each virtual server sharing the resources of the physical server between them. However an effective virtual infrastructure cannot run upon a single physical server so proper implementation of virtual servers requires the use of multiple physical servers and more than likely a device capable of providing shared storage between the physical servers. This means the starting cost of a Virtual Server solution is higher than that of a single physical server solution.</span></p>
<p><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">The advantage of Virtual Servers is that each server can be run upon any capable physical server and so the failure of a physical server, with a proper environment in place, means any affected servers that were sharing that physical server, can be started up seamlessly on any other available physical server. This can even be automated within most virtual infrastructure solutions which leads to near zero downtime. One of the consequences however of Virtual Servers is that because you can have multiple Virtual Servers on a physical server the temptation is to put each software product onto its own server because there is not the cost limitation of having to have one physical server for each. This is known in the industry as “server sprawl” and it is something to be avoided. While the benefits of Virtual Servers are significant, they still need to be planned and maintained effectively to ensure their continued productivity.</span></p>
<p><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">Cloud:</span></p>
<p class="separator"><img id="BLOG_video-UPLOADING-0" class="tr_noresize tr_placeholder BLOGGER-new-video BLOGGER-object-element" src="https://www.blogger.com/video-thumbnail.g?contentId=UPLOADING" alt="" /></p>
<p class="separator">
<p><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">Cloud is a general term, largely expressed in marketing, to describe any server/service that is put outside your own control for someone else to maintain on your behalf. This type of solution is not new and have historically been called outsourcing, services from Application Service Providers and more going back over the last 4 years in Kenya. The Cloud terminology has gained great traction with decision makers because it sounds like a wonderful and cheap solution to remove IT considerations from a business.</span></p>
<p><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">My note of caution with Cloud solutions is that anyone who has used IT services will know that the quality of service varies greatly between providers and even over time, with some providers being exceptional but gradually failing to deliver sometimes after years of effective service. Cloud solutions are generally designed by the provider as a one way solution. They assume that everyone that uses them will be forever happy with them and will never want to leave and so designing or considering the process of a customer leaving is rarely addressed. Strategic use of Public Cloud, Private Cloud, Hybrid Cloud and any other Cloud term you are likely to see or hear is definitely effective and a number of Kenyan Engineers have been providing services that are considered Cloud for a number of years now. In fact they are probablyamong the most experienced Cloud providers there is in Africa. However implementing a Cloud solution is something that everyone has to go into with their eyes wide open and a clear understanding of what will be provided, who will provide, who has access to your information, is it protected from disaster (and is the provider responsible for its loss!) and ultimately can you move to more advanced services or services that suit your business better in the future that will inevitably occur.</span></p>
<p><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">There are several advantages and disadvantages to each option. These range from power consumption, storage requirements, maintenance, product licensing and more. This wide range of considerations also mean almost no business has the exact same needs as another and so it is important to ensure you engage someone competent in all of these options and considerations before you make any decision so that the decision you make is the right one. The cost and effort involved in reversing decisions that turn out to be wrong can be catastrophic.</span></p>
<p><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:small;">There are several Kenyan engineers who are now widely versed in these solutions and implement and support every conceivable variation of them on a daily basis. If anyone would like to mail and find more on these expertise and knowledge please email sknjeri@wichita.edu or samwelkariuki@icloud.com and i will gladly assist you.May Africa stars shine beyond the so called or discussed Cloud services.Its time for africa to rise and shine.</span></p>
</div><br />  <a rel="nofollow" href="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/gocomments/sknjeri.wordpress.com/185/"><img alt="" border="0" src="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/comments/sknjeri.wordpress.com/185/" /></a> <img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=sknjeri.wordpress.com&#038;blog=51744474&#038;post=185&#038;subd=sknjeri&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />]]></content:encoded>
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 </item>
  <item>
  <title>NEW SERVICES ABOUT CLOUD COMPUTING</title>
  <link>https://sknjeri.wordpress.com/2014/03/02/new-services-about-cloud-computing/</link>
  <comments>https://sknjeri.wordpress.com/2014/03/02/new-services-about-cloud-computing/#comments</comments>
  <pubDate>Sun, 02 Mar 2014 10:40:27 +0000</pubDate>
  <dc:creator><![CDATA[samwelkariuki]]></dc:creator>
    <category><![CDATA[Uncategorized]]></category>

  <guid isPermaLink="false">http://sknjeri.wordpress.com/?p=178</guid>
  <description><![CDATA[   Kenya is an amazing place to gather knowledge#trustMe,just mingle with the right group.Recently i just learn how to install some cloud computing services to other OS&#8217;s like ubuntu and the likes-This lovely sunday,i wanna share the same with our african techno-gigs,telcom aficionados and ICT lovers:Its about SALT. Salt is a tool which is used [&#8230;]<img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=sknjeri.wordpress.com&#038;blog=51744474&#038;post=178&#038;subd=sknjeri&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />]]></description>
    <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>   Kenya is an amazing place to gather knowledge#trustMe,just mingle with the right group.Recently i just learn how to install some cloud computing services to other OS&#8217;s like ubuntu and the likes-This lovely sunday,i wanna share the same with our african techno-gigs,telcom aficionados and ICT lovers:Its about SALT.</p>
<p>Salt is a tool which is used for remote exection, configuration management, code deployment and communication topologies. Salt competes with popular cofiguration management tools like chef and puppet. Salt claims to scale up to tens and thousands of servers. Salt is used by one of the social networking giants Linkedin for their infrastructure management.Salt has a very shallow learning curve and you can get going quickly.<a href="https://sknjeri.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/1736765_10202308871997661_355819987_o.jpg"><img class=" wp-image alignright" id="i-177" alt="Image" src="https://sknjeri.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/1736765_10202308871997661_355819987_o.jpg?w=390&#038;h=390" width="390" height="390" /></a></p>
<p><b>Architecture:</b></p>
<ol>
<li>There is a master server and it connects to the agent servers (called minions) in your infrastructure.</li>
<li>The master can run commands in the minions parallelly, it is what make salt very fast.</li>
<li>The minions will execute the command sent by master and return it.</li>
</ol>
<p>There are few concepts associated with salt.</p>
<p>Also Read:  <a href="http://www.comtechies.com/2013/08/setting-up-open-source-chef-server.html" target="_blank">Opscode Chef Configuration Management tool setup</a></p>
<p><b>Returners: U</b>sing which you can redirect the return object of executed code to any system which can accept data, like reddis, mongodb, or a PostgresSQL database.</p>
<div>
<div><a href="https://sknjeri.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/cb8a7-architecture.png"><img alt="" src="https://sknjeri.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/cb8a7-architecture.png?w=400&#038;h=298" width="400" height="298" border="0" /></a></div>
<div> </div>
<div><b>Salt-syndic:</b> salt syndic is an interface which lets you to control various salt masters in different data centers or different sections in an infrastructure from one centralized salt-master.</div>
<div> </div>
<div><a href="https://sknjeri.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/33a14-multi-arch.png"><img alt="" src="https://sknjeri.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/33a14-multi-arch.png?w=640&#038;h=354" width="640" height="354" border="0" /></a></div>
<div><b>Reactor:</b></div>
<p>Reactor sit up in the master. You can configure the reactor to list to the events .When the minions fire some events to the even bus in the salt master , the reactor handles the event by taking necessary actions based up the conditions set in the reactor. For example , if Jenkins is running on one of the minions and it fires an event to master saying the build has finished, the reactor in turn handles the event and redirect to another minion to take actions based on the Jenkins successful build.</p>
<p><b>GitFS:</b><br />In salt you can git as a source repository and pull the source files to server them to minions.<br />In this tutorial, am goin to set the salt master in RHEL and salt minion in Ubuntu 13.04.</p>
<p><b>Setting up salt master on RHEL6:</b><br />1. Enable the EPEL repo
<pre>rpm -Uvh http://ftp.linux.ncsu.edu/pub/epel/6/i386/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm</pre>
<p>2. Install the salt master package using yum
<pre>Yum install salt-master</pre>
<p>3. Set the salt-master service to start on system boot
<pre>Chkconfig salt-master on</pre>
<p>4. Start the salt master
<pre>Service salt-master start</pre>
</div>
<p><b>Setting up salt minion on Ubuntu server:</b><br />If you want both the master and minion in one server, you can install the minion in the same server using yum command. Here am going to use a separate server for installing minion.</p>
<p>1. Add the salt repository</p>
<pre>sudo add-apt-repository ppa:saltstack/salt</pre>
<p>2. Update the repo database</p>
<pre>apt-get update</pre>
<p>3. Install salt minion</p>
<pre>apt-get install salt-minion</pre>
<p><b>Configuring salt Master:</b><br />By default salt master listens to post 4505 and 4506. So make sure these ports are open in Iptables and any firewall if any. If you are using AWS instance , make sure these ports are open in the security groups.</p>
<p><b>Configuring salt minion:</b><br />By default salt minion listens to 4505 and 4506 , so make these ports are opened as mentioned above.<br />Open the /etc/salt/minion and uncomment the master option and give your masters ip</p>
<pre>master : ip of master </pre>
<p> </p>
<div><a href="https://sknjeri.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/f6582-masterconfig.png"><img alt="" src="https://sknjeri.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/f6582-masterconfig.png?w=640&#038;h=268" width="640" height="268" border="0" /></a></div>
<p>By default you have the hostname “salt”. You can use the same name if you edit your /etc/hosts file and make an entry for your salt master with name “salt”.</p>
<p><b>Registering minion with the master:</b><br />1. Start the minion</p>
<pre>salt-minion</pre>
<p>2. The above command will contact the master with keys for authentication.<br />3. Go to salt master and issue the following command to see it has any requests for authentication from new minions.</p>
<pre>salt-key –L</pre>
<p>4. You will see the hostame of the minion under unauthorized keys.<br />5. Accept the keys using the following command</p>
<pre>salt-key  -a  </pre>
<p>6. Once you accept the keys from minion , it will be registered with the master and the master can now issue commands to the minion.<br />7. You can list the minions using the following commands.</p>
<pre>salt-run manage.up 
salt-run manage.status 
salt-run manage.down</pre>
<p><b>Testing master minion connection:</b><br />1. You can check the master minion connection using the simple salt ping test. It gives you output as &#8220;true&#8221;</p>
<pre>salt &lt;minion-name&gt; test:ping</pre>
<p><b>Managing Keys:</b><br />If you want to re-register a minion to the master delete the existing minion key from the master using the following command</p>
<pre>salt-key –d minion-name</pre>
<p>Restart the minion after deleting the key and start it again to register it with new keys. </p>
<p>Salt has a GUI called Halite, which is in pre-alpha stage.</p>
<p>Kindly share the article and leave a comment for queries. &#8211; </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="color:#666666;font-family:'Open Sans', sans-serif;font-size:large;">Author:Samwel Kariuki</span></p>
<p><span style="color:#666666;font-family:'Open Sans', sans-serif;font-size:large;">website:www.samwelkariuki.blogspot.com</span></p><br />  <a rel="nofollow" href="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/gocomments/sknjeri.wordpress.com/178/"><img alt="" border="0" src="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/comments/sknjeri.wordpress.com/178/" /></a> <img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=sknjeri.wordpress.com&#038;blog=51744474&#038;post=178&#038;subd=sknjeri&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />]]></content:encoded>
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  <title>DYNAMICS OF CLOUD COMPUTING IN FIBRE OPTICS</title>
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  <pubDate>Sun, 29 Dec 2013 14:12:27 +0000</pubDate>
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    <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><a href="https://sknjeri.wordpress.com/2013/12/29/dynamics-of-cloud-computing-in-fibre-optics/">DYNAMICS OF CLOUD COMPUTING IN FIBRE OPTICS</a>.</p><br />  <a rel="nofollow" href="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/gocomments/sknjeri.wordpress.com/175/"><img alt="" border="0" src="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/comments/sknjeri.wordpress.com/175/" /></a> <img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=sknjeri.wordpress.com&#038;blog=51744474&#038;post=175&#038;subd=sknjeri&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />]]></content:encoded>
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  <title>DYNAMICS OF CLOUD COMPUTING IN FIBRE OPTICS</title>
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  <pubDate>Sun, 29 Dec 2013 13:36:53 +0000</pubDate>
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  <description><![CDATA[  Technology has evolved almost immeasurably in the past several decades. I remember a few months back watching Telkom kenya discuss optical fiber. It went something like this: “Telkom(k) Company has fiber that can carry 24 phone calls on a fiber as thin as a human hair.” Using a standard calculation that a single phone [&#8230;]<img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=sknjeri.wordpress.com&#038;blog=51744474&#038;post=167&#038;subd=sknjeri&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />]]></description>
    <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>  Technology has evolved almost immeasurably in the past several decades. I remember a few months back watching Telkom kenya discuss optical fiber. It went something like this: “Telkom(k) Company has fiber that can carry 24 phone calls on a fiber as thin as a human hair.” Using a standard calculation that a single phone call is 64 kbits/sec (64,000 bits per second), a total of 24 phone calls would be 1.54 Mbits/sec (1.54 million bits per second)—or the equivalent of a Digital Signal 1 (DS1).</p>
<p>Let’s jump to current day. We now have fiber carrying Terabits—one trillion bits per second. That is an enormous amount of information passing at the speed of light through this one strand of fiber the size of a human hair.With this as a frame of reference, let’s now take a look at the impact of fiber in a data center environment. Data centers of the past were copper-based with multiple DS1 and Digital Signal 3 (DS3, approximate transmission rate of 45 Mbits/sec) lines handling the load of servers to an Optical Carrier 3 (OC3) with a transmission rate of 155 Mbits/sec. This OC3 would connect the servers to the network cloud or outside world. Copper dominated in a data center environment and the only fiber installed was that single line connecting the servers to the network cloud. All DS1 and DS3 connections were on copper panels, possibly with a digital access and crossconnect system (DACS).</p>
<p>    Now in 2013, video (iTunes, Netflix, Hulu and others) and cloud computing/hosted servers, backup and storage, Microsoft CRM, hosted private branch exchanges (PBXs), web analysis tools and web hosting are driving enormous growth in data center server deployments. Data centers are offering rates at DS1, DS3, 5 Mbits/sec, 10 Mbits/sec, 20 Mbits/sec and up to an OC3, all connecting to the outside world via 10-Gbit Ethernet or 100-Gbit Ethernet connections from multiple providers. Today fiber is heavily deployed in Kenya, placing a large concentration of revenue-generating traffic in a small place. To alleviate risk, the data center architecture is evolving away from the previous copper DS1 and DS3 panels, to fiber panels with multiple connections to the client and to the cloud for redundancy.</p>
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<h2><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ThlMFI6kdhE/UsAbonHtX5I/AAAAAAAAC0M/iuOiJfuc4t8/s1600/DSCN0091%5B1%5D.JPG"><img alt="" src="https://images-blogger-opensocial.googleusercontent.com/gadgets/proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F1.bp.blogspot.com%2F-ThlMFI6kdhE%2FUsAbonHtX5I%2FAAAAAAAAC0M%2FiuOiJfuc4t8%2Fs1600%2FDSCN0091%255B1%255D.JPG&amp;container=blogger&amp;gadget=a&amp;rewriteMime=image%2F*" width="320" height="240" border="0" /></a>Fiber connectivity, management</h2>
<p>     Historically, fiber in the data center was not protected with the same level of sophistication as was provided by telecommunications service providers. There were two standards—the high-end product lines that are used by the telkom (k) ensures the ultimate in reliability, and the low-end solutions used in the data center. However, the line between data and telco have become blurred, and as a result, the sophisticated standards deployed by the telkom(k) ltd are now being implemented in the data center. Fortunately, this does not equate to a huge increase in cost. In fact, choosing a fiber-management architecture that delivers reliability, modularity and scalability, without giving up density, will actually reduce the cost of fiber deployment. Choosing a modular fiber panel ensures that additional fiber connections can be added, on an as-needed basis, thus lowering the ongoing cost per port.</p>
<p>  For maintaining a fiber connection, proper handling techniques like cleaning the fiber are now brought to the forefront. Some copper connections can be wiped clean simply; not so with fiber. A dirty fiber connection can cause a completely blocked signal or introduce attenuation, thus limiting the distance of the signal. Equipment such as a fiber microscope is used to look at a fiber to see how clean the connection is. (Note: Never look into a fiber that is connected to a system.) Cleaning the fiber can be performed with specialty products available on the market, used in adherence to industry cleaning standards. These specifications are good references.</p>
<ul>
<li>IEC 61300-3-35, Fibre Optic Interconnecting Devices and Passive Components – Basic Test and Measurement Procedures</li>
<li>IPC 8497-1, Cleaning Methods and Contamination Assessment for Optical Assembly</li>
<li>IEC 62627 (DTR), Fibre Optic Interconnecting Devices and Passive Components – Fibre Optic Connector Cleaning Methods</li>
</ul>
<h2>Performance expectations</h2>
<p>Ensuring minimal insertion loss is key to performance of the network. In recent years, Telkom (k) ltd has established that the standard for loss should be no more than 0.4 dB. When it re-set the standard to 0.4 dB of loss, most patch cord vendors reported performance “typical” of the Telkom standard. As “typical,” the process to build the patch cord was capable of delivering 0.4-dB performance, but each individual cord that came off the line may or may not meet the standard—did 51 percent of the cords match the standard? 75 percent?Few patch cord vendors were “guaranteeing” the 0.4-dB loss, as it required extensive quality-control measures in their production process and very tight tolerances in their test metrics. These tightened performance specifications were perceived by the vendor as expensive and cost-prohibitive. Achieving a “guaranteed” performance level was expected to result in extensive production-floor “scrap” as patch cords that did not meet the guaranteed number were either set aside as “seconds” or repolished to achieve the desired results. Because there were no guarantees, network designers needed to allow for variation in patch cord performance. As a result, their network designs did not fully benefit from the reported performance enhancements.</p>
<p>     Performance of the fiber, guaranteed for immediate and ongoing performance for the life of the network, is critical to delivering the user experience that cloud computing promises. Not only should you demand guaranteed (rather than typical) performance of your fiber, but 0.4 dB should not be good enough in today’s demanding world. Vendors that have built their data centers for optimal performance are delivering guaranteed 0.2-dB loss.Entering the 21st century, we have seen a significant increase in the use of data centers. As a telco guy by heritage, Im now growning up with the central office as the core of a telco network and have seen an incredible amount of evolution that will occur over the coming years(vision 2030). Today there is even talk of data centers being the central offices of the future. With fiber being tested and verified by telco service providers over the past 20 years, the data center manager has some great practical wisdom to follow. We find ourselves at a time of great opportunity as we learn from the past to continue to create an exciting future. The best is yet to come.</p>
<p>   Africa needs to shine and its the natives that will do so.Hope is a waking dream so lets all make Africa and moreso Kenya the Tech point of this great continent.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Source:samwelkariuki.blogspot.com</p>
<p>Author:Samwel Kariuki</p><br />  <a rel="nofollow" href="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/gocomments/sknjeri.wordpress.com/167/"><img alt="" border="0" src="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/comments/sknjeri.wordpress.com/167/" /></a> <img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=sknjeri.wordpress.com&#038;blog=51744474&#038;post=167&#038;subd=sknjeri&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />]]></content:encoded>
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  <title>Telkom Orange Kenya Ltd in Relation to Fibre Networks</title>
  <link>https://sknjeri.wordpress.com/2013/12/13/telkom-orange-kenya-ltd-in-relation-to-fibre-networks-2/</link>
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  <pubDate>Fri, 13 Dec 2013 13:53:08 +0000</pubDate>
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  <description><![CDATA[Telkom Orange Kenya Ltd in Relation to Fibre Networks.<img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=sknjeri.wordpress.com&#038;blog=51744474&#038;post=164&#038;subd=sknjeri&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />]]></description>
    <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><a href="https://sknjeri.wordpress.com/2013/12/13/telkom-orange-kenya-ltd-in-relation-to-fibre-networks/">Telkom Orange Kenya Ltd in Relation to Fibre Networks</a>.</p><br />  <a rel="nofollow" href="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/gocomments/sknjeri.wordpress.com/164/"><img alt="" border="0" src="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/comments/sknjeri.wordpress.com/164/" /></a> <img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=sknjeri.wordpress.com&#038;blog=51744474&#038;post=164&#038;subd=sknjeri&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />]]></content:encoded>
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  <title>Telkom Orange Kenya Ltd in Relation to Fibre Networks</title>
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  <pubDate>Fri, 13 Dec 2013 13:47:50 +0000</pubDate>
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  <description><![CDATA[    Increased use of cloud services by kenyan businesses has created a need for increased capacity in the data network. Telkom Orange Kenya Ltd is responding to this trend with a Ksh 40 billion investment in fibre optic broadband for businesses. Telkom Orange Kenya Ltd spends over Ksh 40 billion per year upgrading and modernising [&#8230;]<img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=sknjeri.wordpress.com&#038;blog=51744474&#038;post=151&#038;subd=sknjeri&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />]]></description>
    <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>    Increased use of cloud services by kenyan businesses has created a need for increased capacity in the data network. Telkom Orange Kenya Ltd is responding to this trend with a Ksh 40 billion investment in fibre optic broadband for businesses.</p>
<p>Telkom Orange Kenya Ltd spends over Ksh 40 billion per year upgrading and modernising the telephone, TV, and data networks in Kenya. Much of the investment goes into the comprehensive expansion of the fibre optic broadband network for the business market.The need for higher bandwidth in kenyan businesses is rising. We are currently experiencing a trend where services that were previously on local servers at each individual company are now moving to the Internet as cloud-based services. In addition, the use of video services in businesses is also increasing, both for live use and for training.The opportunities for savings through the use of cloud-based services are substantial, but services such as email, document storage and sharing, and accounting software require a stable and secure Internet connection with high capacity. Telkom Orange Kenya Ltd has therefore set in motion a vigorous investment programme into fibre optic broadband for the business market, both in terms of Internet access and virtual private networks (VPNs). With fibre optic broadband,  companies will be ready for tomorrow’s digital solutions.</p>
<h2>Simple model</h2>
<p>Telkom Orange Kenya Ltd has been building fibre optic infrastructure for the business market for many years. The model, now being used as a basis by the company for its proactive initiatives, will make fibre optic services more accessible to the nation’s businesses, including small and medium sized companies. The prerequisite is that there must be a minimum customer potential in an area for the company to start expansion.When a customer contacts us wanting a fibre optic connection, we check the company’s location and proximity to other companies. All companies in urban areas with a certain concentration of businesses will be able to receive fibre optic broadband from Telkom Orange Kenya Ltd.</p>
<h2>Modernising the copper network</h2>
<p>Even though Telkom Orange Kenya Ltd is now investing heavily in fibre optic, DSL broadband over the copper network will still be the technology that offers the best coverage across kenya for a long time to come. Therefore, Telkom Orange Kenya Ltd will in parallel with the fibre optic expansion also be upgrading the copper network in several places.In areas where  broadband is on several different technologies, Telkom Orange Kenya Ltd consider replacing the copper network with faster technology. A course of modernisation such as this will take place over many years, and no services of solutions will be removed before they are able to offer something that is at least as good. They will then help customers to move to new solutions, and  will notify customers well in advance within the applicable notice periods and existing agreement terms.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Source:internet(www.samwelkariuki.blogspot.com)</p>
<p>Author:Samwel Kariuki Njeri</p><br />  <a rel="nofollow" href="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/gocomments/sknjeri.wordpress.com/151/"><img alt="" border="0" src="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/comments/sknjeri.wordpress.com/151/" /></a> <img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=sknjeri.wordpress.com&#038;blog=51744474&#038;post=151&#038;subd=sknjeri&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />]]></content:encoded>
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  <title>Fibre Optics in relation to Cloud computing</title>
  <link>https://sknjeri.wordpress.com/2013/11/19/fibre-optics-in-relation-to-cloud-computing/</link>
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  <pubDate>Tue, 19 Nov 2013 07:16:26 +0000</pubDate>
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  <description><![CDATA[   Until very recently, broadband availability in Africa was a major issue for both businesses and individuals. It limited access to modern business programmes and applications, including access to the cloud, that are taken for granted in many countries. Cloud computing has the capability to transform how businesses in Africa operate, whilst the rise of [&#8230;]<img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=sknjeri.wordpress.com&#038;blog=51744474&#038;post=141&#038;subd=sknjeri&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />]]></description>
    <content:encoded><![CDATA[<div dir="ltr">   Until very recently, broadband availability in Africa was a major issue for both</div>
<div dir="ltr">businesses and individuals. It limited access to modern business programmes and</div>
<div dir="ltr">applications, including access to the cloud, that are taken for granted in many</div>
<div dir="ltr">countries. Cloud computing has the capability to transform how businesses in</div>
<div dir="ltr">Africa operate, whilst the rise of smartphones and tablet devices is increasing</div>
<div dir="ltr">consumer use of the cloud to access a rapidly expanding mix of applications in</div>
<div dir="ltr">areas such as social media, entertainment and education.</div>
<div dir="ltr">A symbiotic relationship exists between cloud computing and bandwidth – each</div>
<div dir="ltr">supporting the growth of the other. Cost-effective access to reliable, high-capacity and</div>
<div dir="ltr">affordable bandwidth is vital to the evolution of cloud computing in Africa, which is</div>
<div dir="ltr">itself a driver for the continuing deployment and activation of terrestrial and submarine</div>
<div dir="ltr">fibre-optic network capacity.</div>
<div dir="ltr">     An emerging ICT industry in Africa is anticipating that its future will be dependent on</div>
<div dir="ltr">serving customers and businesses through mobile cloud applications. With the rapid</div>
<div dir="ltr">uptake of smartphones in Africa, many region-specific mobile device applications are</div>
<div dir="ltr">being developed and the continent is gaining a reputation as a centre for innovation in</div>
<div dir="ltr">this sector &#8211; one prime example being iHub in Nairobi, Kenya, an open space for</div>
<div dir="ltr">technologists, investors and technology companies interested in developing innovative</div>
<div dir="ltr">IT products. The space is a community technology facility, with a focus on young</div>
<div dir="ltr">entrepreneurs, web and mobile phone programmers, designers and researchers. The</div>
<div dir="ltr">concept of the iHub is the first of its kind in Kenya and there is great expectation it will</div>
<div dir="ltr">spur on the technology revolution throughout Africa.</div>
<div dir="ltr">      Cloud computing was initially developed for business use, offering opportunities for</div>
<div dir="ltr">increased mobility, flexibility and scalability and the ability to move from capex to opex.</div>
<div dir="ltr">However, it has also turned out to be of enormous benefit to the millions of people in</div>
<div dir="ltr">rural areas who don’t own a computer and whose lives can be changed dramatically by</div>
<div dir="ltr">a couple of mobile applications. Safaricom’s M-PESA mobile payment system, for</div>
<div dir="ltr">example, allows its customers to transfer money to each other via mobile phones,</div>
<div dir="ltr">without the need to visit a bank or ATM, and has largely replaced cash transactions in</div>
<div dir="ltr">Kenya. Governments are also supporting such technological developments, anticipating</div>
<div dir="ltr">cloud-based technology will help transform economies, improve education and public</div>
<div dir="ltr">health, and even protect the environment.</div>
<div dir="ltr">  However, there is one other group of potential beneficiaries linked to the emergence of</div>
<div dir="ltr">cloud computing &#8211; telcos and ISPs selling connectivity and services to their customers.</div>
<div dir="ltr">Development of the cloud services market in Africa depends heavily upon continued</div>
<div dir="ltr">service provider investment in network infrastructure to maintain a reliable, high-quality</div>
<div dir="ltr">service. As Africa’s carriers’ carrier, WIOCC is ideally placed to observe changing</div>
<div dir="ltr">bandwidth requirements. Its ability to provide cost-effective, reliable, international</div>
<div dir="ltr">connectivity to carriers in Africa will keep it at the forefront of future developments in</div>
<div dir="ltr">the cloud arena.
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  <title>BUILDING YOUR MOBILE APP ON CLOUD IN LESS THAN AN HOUR</title>
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  <pubDate>Wed, 10 Jul 2013 09:48:18 +0000</pubDate>
  <dc:creator><![CDATA[samwelkariuki]]></dc:creator>
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    <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><a href="https://sknjeri.wordpress.com/2013/07/10/building-your-mobile-app-on-cloud-in-less-than-an-hour/">BUILDING YOUR MOBILE APP ON CLOUD IN LESS THAN AN HOUR</a>.</p>
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  <title>BUILDING YOUR MOBILE APP ON CLOUD IN LESS THAN AN HOUR</title>
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  <description><![CDATA[Two of the hottest topics in technology today are “mobile” and “cloud.” They are at the top of most CTOs list of objectives, yet they also seem to be the ones most shrouded in mystery. So where do our young Kenyan tech savvy and/or computer aficionados start? With the video and do-it-yourself guide below! This [&#8230;]<img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=sknjeri.wordpress.com&#038;blog=51744474&#038;post=132&#038;subd=sknjeri&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />]]></description>
    <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Two of the hottest topics in technology today are “mobile” and “cloud.” They are at the top of most CTOs list of objectives, yet they also seem to be the ones most shrouded in mystery. So where do our young Kenyan tech savvy and/or computer aficionados start?</p>
<p>With the video and do-it-yourself guide below!</p>
<p>This<a href="https://sknjeri.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/2013-05-17-14-06-14.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-137 alignright" alt="2013-05-17 14.06.14" src="https://sknjeri.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/2013-05-17-14-06-14.jpg?w=225&#038;h=300" width="225" height="300" /></a> year, at NCSIT 2013 Nairobi, I ran a session where we built a complete database-backed web application from scratch using the SpringSource Tool Suite and the Grails framework for Java. Then, we published the application to Cloud Foundry—an open VMcloud Platform-as-a-Service offering. Finally, we proceeded to build a mobile application that consumed the data from the web application built earlier.  I broke a cardinal rule by doing the entire session live, but it all went off without a hitch and audience participation with the application was an absolute blast. By the time we were done, we had built two applications from the ground up, and folks had an application that looked, smelled, and tasted like a native mobile application running on their phones. And, we did all of this in less than one hour!</p>
<p>In the months since, I have had multiple interactions with STEM advocates for Africa,start-ups Innovation firms in Kenya,Youth initiative programs directed towards Konza city and OpenWorld Ltd attendees. I have heard from many who followed the session content—they were building their own mobile applications using the same technologies and using the guide we used at OpenWorld!</p>
<p>In particular, a gentleman in the audience interrupted me recently as I was presenting at an event in Sarova Panafric. As I started talking about Cloud Foundry, he said that he was in our OpenWorld session and had redone the whole lab himself. And, the best part of his interruption? He wasn’t a traditional programmer. He was more focused on infrastructure, which was very rewarding to hear.  These are the things that make it fun to get up and go to work each day.</p>
<p>During the OpenWorld session we talked a bit about the “mobile dilemma” and the challenges that exist in mobile application development.  In this post, I thought I would:<br />
a) trim down the session content into just the programming pieces,<br />
b) make a video to share with the blogosphere,<br />
c) provide a complete “Do It Yourself Guide” to download and follow along.</p>
<p>The guide is a walkthrough and very basic introduction to some 101 “mobile web” concepts and technologies.  So, let me attempt to pull on my flame-proof suit up front with the following disclaimers:</p>
<p>This is not a formal dissertation on proper enterprise mobile application development methodologies and lifecycle management.<br />
This is not a “full stack” bootcamp that will make you a mobile rockstar.<br />
This is not a formal class on any specific development technology.<br />
This is not a  “best practices” view on mobile development.<br />
This is not a substitute for taking a proper mobile development course!</p>
<p>The purpose of this blog post is to simply have some fun and provide a simple introduction to help folks write their own mobile applications using a web technology stack that could easily be scaled in the future. And, I wanted to do it with technologies that<br />
a) folks could go and grab easily and<br />
b) implement immediately without having to buy anything, require existing services, or have any other “stuff” to deal with.  We will show you everything: from how to sign up for your very own Cloud Foundry account and download the SpringSource Tool Suite; to writing the web and mobile applications.  All from scratch.</p>
<p>In my travels,trainings and interactions, I find many enterprises big and small(SMEs) struggling to get started in this space.  Most everybody has a mobile application of some sort nowadays, but many times they are little more than what used to be a static website in the late 90’s.  Or perhaps, it’s a marketing tool.  More times than not, the entire development process was outsourced.  But now, people want to start building mobile apps themselves with real data and real logic.  And, they want real applications that provide business value or competitive differentiation. A good example of such an application is &#8220;OpenBusiness&#8221; which is 100% Kenyan made from design to the functionalities that befit the Kenyan business environment. My hope is that you will get an introduction to some technologies that allow you to reuse the web skills you have in house to build your very own mobile applications and use the experience as a launching pad into your next generation mobile strategy.</p>
<p>If nothing else, I hope you have some fun and can show off your new crazy mad mobile chops to your friends!  <img width='16' height='16' class='wp-smiley emoji' draggable='false' alt=':-)' src='https://s1.wp.com/wp-content/mu-plugins/wpcom-smileys/simple-smile.svg' style='height: 1em; max-height: 1em;' /></p>
<p>Now go build something!</p>
<p>Author:Samwel</p>
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For visual studio users,recent times are calling for nifty applications that can safeguard your code program,include awesome features that one couldn't in VS 2010.Upgrade my fellow programmers!!!!
Enjoy your remaining afternoon as you code your way through. 

Friday, 19 February 2016

DATA CENTERS,WIRELESS NETWORKING AND SECURITY SYSTEMS IN KENYA #2016 FORUM

As i engaged these two brilliant minds on a very positive enchanting data center,wireless networking and ethical hacking,i realized along the heated discussions that to the optimist, the glass is half full. To the pessimist, the
glass is half empty. To an engineer, the glass is twice as big
as it needs to be.Africa has and poses a wider much bigger opportunity of growing young talents and has room for each and every one of us.The 'play field' is twice as big for all of us than we assume it to be.Lets be the Change!


Wednesday, 20 January 2016

MY LETTER TO THE QUEEN OF AFRICA

video

To my dear Mother,
Mum,you've raised me from Magarini,raised me up in Kaloleni and always are looking out for me everywhere i go.I have been branded with folly and madness for attempting what our country and county calls impossibilities, and even from haters wa kimtaani who said ... that I deserved hanging for bringing you a good simple life that you've always wanted.Today i received an email from NASA acknowledging my efforts and all i could think about is God,you and cronies with whom we've proved wannabes wrong by shining out from the ghetto projects.This has so far been my reward from those who believed in me; but should this be all, I shall be satisfied by the great secret pleasure and laudable pride that I feel in my own heart from having been the instrument of bringing forward new principles and new arrangements of boundless value to you mummy and however much I may be straitened in pecuniary circumstances, the great honour of being a useful subject can never be taken from me, which far exceeds riches.More is coming your way for raising me up and to the places i was born and raised.‪#‎PippingWater‬ my first gift to you.Happy new year 2016 mum!
Yours faithful and loving son,
Kariuki Samwel N

Thursday, 24 December 2015

OPTIMIZING DATA CLOUD IN AFRICA THROUGH ENGINEERING

As we come to an end on this remarkable 2015,i've come to agree with a few cronies of mine(Sir Wamz,Mr Pascal,Collo among others) that engineering is quite different from science. Scientists try to understand nature. Engineers try to make things that do not exist in nature. Engineers stress invention. To embody an invention the engineer must put his idea in concrete terms, and design something that people can use. That something can be a device, a gadget, a material, a method, a computing program, an innovative experiment, a new solution to a problem, or an improvement on what is existing. Since a design has to be concrete, it must have its geometry, dimensions, and characteristic numbers. Almost all engineers working on new designs find that they do not have all the needed information. Most often, they are limited by insufficient scientific knowledge. Thus they study mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology and mechanics. Often they have to add to the sciences relevant to their profession.And for such reason,I have decided to work this festive season to make the company i work for a noble prototype of industry, penetrating in science, reliable in engineering, creative in aesthetics and wholesomely prosperous in economics.
  2016 brings with it new possibilities that as a young focused curious kenyan i would not stop in getting the very best out of new advancements being made globally.Indeed, the most important part of engineering work to me next coming year—and also of other scientific work—will be to determine methods of attacking the problems, whatever it may be, whether an experimental investigation, or a theoretical calculation. … It is by the choice of a suitable method of attack, that intricate problems are reduced to simple phenomena, and then easily solved.That will be my #2016drive.
 

Tuesday, 4 November 2014

Physical Servers Vs Virtual Servers Vs Cloud

Physical Servers Vs Virtual Servers Vs Cloud

There can be several different reasons why Kenyan businesses ad companies are choosing either a Physical or Virtual Server for their day to day errands. Considerations such as business size, needs and price are all factors to take in to account. My goal is to give you a helicopter view of the key points of each so when you discuss the options best suited for your firm,you are informed on some of the terminology and factors.
Physical Servers:
Physical Servers are the traditional way of doing things (in IT traditional means more than 3 years ago!) and involve a piece(s) of hardware that are configured to perform the tasks of your business. Generally this hardware is in your server room or broom closet. They can play any role required in the business, from Mail Server to a Web Host Server or even a combination of a wide variety of roles where required. With physical servers there is a tendency to try and do more with less.
The advantage of a Physical Server for a small business with limited server needs, is that the one server can perform all the tasks required for the day to day running of the business. As your business scales up in size you will have a 2nd server and 3rd and so on, the number generally corresponding with scale of the business. Each server will generally be critical to the business in some form because rarely do people sign off on implementing a new server to do something inconsequential. Inconsequential tasks are added to an existing server where it won’t conflict with something in place.
Virtual Servers:
A Virtual Server is normally one of many servers that operate upon a single physical server with each virtual server sharing the resources of the physical server between them. However an effective virtual infrastructure cannot run upon a single physical server so proper implementation of virtual servers requires the use of multiple physical servers and more than likely a device capable of providing shared storage between the physical servers. This means the starting cost of a Virtual Server solution is higher than that of a single physical server solution.
The advantage of Virtual Servers is that each server can be run upon any capable physical server and so the failure of a physical server, with a proper environment in place, means any affected servers that were sharing that physical server, can be started up seamlessly on any other available physical server. This can even be automated within most virtual infrastructure solutions which leads to near zero downtime. One of the consequences however of Virtual Servers is that because you can have multiple Virtual Servers on a physical server the temptation is to put each software product onto its own server because there is not the cost limitation of having to have one physical server for each. This is known in the industry as “server sprawl” and it is something to be avoided. While the benefits of Virtual Servers are significant, they still need to be planned and maintained effectively to ensure their continued productivity.
Cloud:

Cloud is a general term, largely expressed in marketing, to describe any server/service that is put outside your own control for someone else to maintain on your behalf. This type of solution is not new and have historically been called outsourcing, services from Application Service Providers and more going back over the last 4 years in Kenya. The Cloud terminology has gained great traction with decision makers because it sounds like a wonderful and cheap solution to remove IT considerations from a business.
My note of caution with Cloud solutions is that anyone who has used IT services will know that the quality of service varies greatly between providers and even over time, with some providers being exceptional but gradually failing to deliver sometimes after years of effective service. Cloud solutions are generally designed by the provider as a one way solution. They assume that everyone that uses them will be forever happy with them and will never want to leave and so designing or considering the process of a customer leaving is rarely addressed. Strategic use of Public Cloud, Private Cloud, Hybrid Cloud and any other Cloud term you are likely to see or hear is definitely effective and a number of Kenyan Engineers have been providing services that are considered Cloud for a number of years now. In fact they are probablyamong the most experienced Cloud providers there is in Africa. However implementing a Cloud solution is something that everyone has to go into with their eyes wide open and a clear understanding of what will be provided, who will provide, who has access to your information, is it protected from disaster (and is the provider responsible for its loss!) and ultimately can you move to more advanced services or services that suit your business better in the future that will inevitably occur.
There are several advantages and disadvantages to each option. These range from power consumption, storage requirements, maintenance, product licensing and more. This wide range of considerations also mean almost no business has the exact same needs as another and so it is important to ensure you engage someone competent in all of these options and considerations before you make any decision so that the decision you make is the right one. The cost and effort involved in reversing decisions that turn out to be wrong can be catastrophic.
There are several Kenyan engineers who are now widely versed in these solutions and implement and support every conceivable variation of them on a daily basis. If anyone would like to mail and find more on these expertise and knowledge please email sknjeri@wichita.edu or samwelkariuki@icloud.com and i will gladly assist you.May Africa stars shine beyond the so called or discussed Cloud services.Its time for africa to rise and shine.

Sunday, 2 March 2014

NEW SERVICES ABOUT CLOUD COMPUTING

   Kenya is an amazing place to gather knowledge#trustMe,just mingle with the right group.Recently i just learn how to install some cloud computing services to other OS's like ubuntu and the likes-This lovely sunday,i wanna share the same with our african techno-gigs,telcom aficionados and ICT lovers:Its about SALT.
Salt is a tool which is used for remote exection, configuration management, code deployment and communication topologies. Salt competes with popular cofiguration management tools like chef and puppet. Salt claims to scale up to tens and thousands of servers. Salt is used by one of the social networking giants Linkedin for their infrastructure management.Salt has a very shallow learning curve and you can get going quickly.

Architecture:
  1. There is a master server and it connects to the agent servers (called minions) in your infrastructure.
  2. The master can run commands in the minions parallelly, it is what make salt very fast.
  3. The minions will execute the command sent by master and return it.
There are few concepts associated with salt.

Also Read:  Opscode Chef Configuration Management tool setup

Returners: Using which you can redirect the return object of executed code to any system which can accept data, like reddis, mongodb, or a PostgresSQL database.


Salt-syndic: salt syndic is an interface which lets you to control various salt masters in different data centers or different sections in an infrastructure from one centralized salt-master.

Reactor:
Reactor sit up in the master. You can configure the reactor to list to the events .When the minions fire some events to the even bus in the salt master , the reactor handles the event by taking necessary actions based up the conditions set in the reactor. For example , if Jenkins is running on one of the minions and it fires an event to master saying the build has finished, the reactor in turn handles the event and redirect to another minion to take actions based on the Jenkins successful build.

GitFS:
In salt you can git as a source repository and pull the source files to server them to minions.
In this tutorial, am goin to set the salt master in RHEL and salt minion in Ubuntu 13.04.

Setting up salt master on RHEL6:
1. Enable the EPEL repo
rpm -Uvh http://ftp.linux.ncsu.edu/pub/epel/6/i386/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm
2. Install the salt master package using yum
Yum install salt-master
3. Set the salt-master service to start on system boot
Chkconfig salt-master on
4. Start the salt master
Service salt-master start
Setting up salt minion on Ubuntu server:
If you want both the master and minion in one server, you can install the minion in the same server using yum command. Here am going to use a separate server for installing minion.

1. Add the salt repository
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:saltstack/salt
2. Update the repo database
apt-get update
3. Install salt minion
apt-get install salt-minion
Configuring salt Master:
By default salt master listens to post 4505 and 4506. So make sure these ports are open in Iptables and any firewall if any. If you are using AWS instance , make sure these ports are open in the security groups.

Configuring salt minion:
By default salt minion listens to 4505 and 4506 , so make these ports are opened as mentioned above.
Open the /etc/salt/minion and uncomment the master option and give your masters ip
master : ip of master 


By default you have the hostname “salt”. You can use the same name if you edit your /etc/hosts file and make an entry for your salt master with name “salt”.

Registering minion with the master:
1. Start the minion
salt-minion
2. The above command will contact the master with keys for authentication.
3. Go to salt master and issue the following command to see it has any requests for authentication from new minions.
salt-key –L
4. You will see the hostame of the minion under unauthorized keys.
5. Accept the keys using the following command
salt-key  -a  
6. Once you accept the keys from minion , it will be registered with the master and the master can now issue commands to the minion.
7. You can list the minions using the following commands.
salt-run manage.up 
salt-run manage.status 
salt-run manage.down
Testing master minion connection:
1. You can check the master minion connection using the simple salt ping test. It gives you output as "true"
salt <minion-name> test:ping
Managing Keys:
If you want to re-register a minion to the master delete the existing minion key from the master using the following command
salt-key –d minion-name
Restart the minion after deleting the key and start it again to register it with new keys. 

Salt has a GUI called Halite, which is in pre-alpha stage.

Kindly share the article and leave a comment for queries. - 

Author:Samwel Kariuki
website:www.sknjeri.wordpress.com